Peter Milligan Pays Tribute To Brett Ewins In His Return To 2000AD With Bad Company

Peter Milligan Pays Tribute To Brett Ewins In His Return To 2000AD With Bad Company

              Peter Milligan is returning after thirteen year to the sci-fi weekly comic 2000AD to revive his co-creation Bad Company, the series he created thirty years ago with Brett Ewins and JimMcCarthy in 1986, hoping it will be “a fitting tribute to a man without whom Bad Company would never have been what it was”. Legendary 2000AD artist and Deadline Magazine co-creator Ewins died last month, aged 59. The new Bad Company story, First Casualties. will debut in 2000 AD Prog 1950, on sale 30th September, with pencils by Rufus Dayglo (Tank Girl) and inks by Jim McCarthy (The Sex Pistols: The Graphic Novel). Peter Milligan says “Since I began writing my new Bad Company story, anyone who’s connected with 2000 AD has probably heard the sad news of the death of Brett Ewins, penciller and vital component of the original Bad Company team. Brett was a great artist and a great friend and this story has become something of a homage to his memory. If that puts more pressure on us to produce a new story that lives up to the Bad Company name so be it. First Casualties is a surprising tale, revealing new truths about Bad Company and their world, and also saying something about our own world. I hope it’s a fitting tribute to a man without whom Bad Company would never have been what it was.” In humanity’s war with a vicious alien species known as the Krool on the planet Ararat, when his own unit is destroyed a young soldier called Danny Franks is recruited by a band of...
Jim McCarthy & Marc Olivent: Reckless Life: Guns N’ Roses – book review

Jim McCarthy & Marc Olivent: Reckless Life: Guns N’ Roses – book review

                Written by Jamie Havlin 1 September, 2015 Reckless Life: Guns N’ Roses (Omnibus Press) Paperback Out Now Jamie Havlin reviews a graphic novel that traces the history of a band synonymous with rock and roll excess and controversy, Guns N’ Roses. In his introduction to the book, Joel McIver writes: ‘You probably know Appetite [For Destruction] pretty well if you’re reading this.’ Well, no. Not me. The phenomenon of Guns N’ Roses largely passed me by. Of course I know tracks like Sweet Child O’ Mine and Paradise City but believe me, my breath was never baited while waiting for Chinese Democracy (luckily enough). Jim McCarthy has previously penned a number of biographical graphic novels, including Sex Pistols: The Graphic Novel and here he tells the tale of Guns N’ Roses, from the early days of Axl Rose and his cohorts getting together through to their spectacular rise to fame and almost equally spectacular fall from grace. It’s the story of the young Rose, that I found most fascinating: his troubled schooldays in Lafayette, Indiana; being regularly hassled by local cops; his stepdad throwing out televisions because they were ‘satanic’ and anger roiling through his body at the self righteousness of the adults from his small town Pentecostal community – and the hypocrisy described here is no great advert for that particular church. Jim McCarthy’s incisive script keeps the action rolling along at a pretty much frantic pace. This is a band that has certainly experienced highs and lows in just about every way and when I say highs, I don’t just...
VOICES OF LATIN ROCK: The E-Mix

VOICES OF LATIN ROCK: The E-Mix

                My new E-book is in the works. A series of in-depth interviews with Latin soul musicians mostly based in San Francisco and Los Angeles. Concentrating on the years 1968 thru to 1977 or so. A time of unparalleled creativity and craziness. Feel the street heat as you marvel at the beat! This is my first e-book apart from the many Graphics I have had released in iTunes and Kindle formats...
BAD COMPANY REVIEW ( PROG 1951)

BAD COMPANY REVIEW ( PROG 1951)

                            2000 A.D. Prog 1951 by Ian Jane Bad Company – First Casualties by Peter Milligan, R. Dayglo and J. McCarthy: Last but most certainly not least, Danny finds out that Kano’s alive. He tells him the war is over in hopes that Kano will stop short of levelling the city – Kano chills out a bit but wants to show Danny what was done to him, what made him the way he is. And so, by a connection they make, he does this and we witness through his own eyes the transformation that befell him. In doing so, the powers that be ‘break’ Kano. His body may have been healed but his mind is a different story but of course the truth behind why the authorities want Danny to bring Kano in, well, that’s got to come out sooner or later, right? Again, great to see Bad Company back in action. Milligan is in his element here, he’s always done his best work when dealing with anti-social subject matter and this lets him dive deep into that as the story subverts the fist-pumping nationalism that surrounds too many instances of military action and replaces it with a look at how it completely fucks people up. Dayglo and McCarthy offer up the perfect visual compliment to this, their splatter punk style and ideal companion to the anarchistic storytelling but at the same time nicely detailed and, if over-exaggerated, to the serial’s advantage....
BAD COMPANY COVER 

BAD COMPANY COVER 

                Bad Company second issue with Rufus Dayglo cover; part two of the 12 part series out...
Bad Company Review…

Bad Company Review…

                    Bad Company Review……….. This was pretty much the main reason I picked up the Prog, thanks to Rufus on social media, and the fact that Peter Milligan was on writing duties, and frack me, the splashes and general chaos on the page did not disappoint! After the initial kaleidoscope and cacophony, though, there’s actually a strangely heartfelt tail about what can happen when war ends. Peter Milligan manages to touch on a sensitive subject about what happens to soldiers when there’s no war anymore without it seeming cheap or tacked on, with the aid of the art from Rufus and Jim McCarthy creating a beautiful Sci-Fi setting around his words. Now as someone that has had no prior exposure, I’m sure this story will come as a shock to many, and the gravitas of it can certainly be felt as it always can when a massive change is made to a status quo. That being said though, at no point did i feel like I’d missed a vital piece of information, and can’t wait to dive into the back catalogue to find out just how we got to this...