The Ramones: Gabba Gabba Hey!

Gabba Gabba Hey: The graphic story of The Ramones is a rough  hewn and in-depth look at the band most likely to be named as the premier and fore running important influence on the the UK punk movement.

Video Discussion

Jim McCarthy on The Ramones: Gabba Gabba Hey!

Ramones: Gabba Gabba Hey!

 

Gabba Gabba Hey, The graphic story of The Ramones is a rough  hewn and in-depth look at the band most likely to be named as the premier and forerunning important influence on the the UK punk movement and the ensuing music industry revolution.

Their torrid rise against the backdrop of a crime ridden New York City from whence they hailed plus the parallel recession in the 1970’s UK portended larger and darker economic and social forces abroad in the world.

(Hey! Does this remind you of something; recession, strikes, anarchy looming, no future in England’s dreaming etc? Oh yes; it reminds me of my TV set today and what is happening right now…)

A lot of prophecy on the streets then and a lot of reckoning now.

The Ramones boiled the essence of rock and roll down to its simplest basics. No frills, no bullshit, just an out and out clamour for the social misfit, the loser, the outsider , the beginnings of Generation X.

Gabba Gabba Hey is a sumptuously considered 178 page graphic book with gorgeous, incisive illustrations by Brian Williamson using densely textured layering throughout the images. The book looks fabulous and is a visual and tightly written treat for lovers of transcendental rock and roll, human drama and epoch altering cultural breakthroughs. All human life is here but not as we know it.

The Ramones’ bubblegum-chewing leather jacket-clad image has always made them seem like a comic strip brought to life, so this 178 page black and white graphic novel about their life is the perfect fit. It uses striking, stylised imagery that suits the distorted chaotic story of The Ramones. Tiff Pelascos

Big Cheese Magazine

Gabba Gabba Hey is a good stylistic fit for the revved-up bubblegum-trash aesthetic of its subject.There is artistry and wit here interweaving the band’s roots in grungy 1970s New York with the urban-paranoia vibe of Taxi Driver and Son Of Sam. Stephen Dalton

Classic Rock magazine